Listed Buildings in Hornsea

There are 29 listings in Hornsea. Some are not actually buildings but are still listed. The  definition of listed building is –

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A ‘listed building‘ is a building, object or structure that has been judged to be of national importance in terms of architectural or historic interest and included on a special register, called the List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.

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HORNSEA LODGE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1272464
HORNSEA LODGE, WASSAND ROAD
Estate lodge. c. 1814. Possibly designed by Thomas Cundy for The Rev. Charles Constable of Wassand Hall. Painted and rendered brick with brick dressings and tile roof. Single storey with a plinth. One single and one pair of brick chimney stacks. East front has a pointed arched doorway to the right with a studded door in a dentilated brick surround. To the left two pointed arched windows with lower lattice casements and Gothick glazed overlights, also in dentilated brick surrounds with dentilated impost bands. To the right a projecting wing with a dentilated brick gable and a similar pointed arched window. The left return also has a similar gable with another pointed arched casement window. This attractive and well-preserved gate lodge was built on the north drive to Wassand Hall.

 

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MUSHROOM COTTAGE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249382
MUSHROOM COTTAGE, A1244

Cottage. Early C19 for Strickland-Constable family of Wassand Hall. Roughcast with timber frame to front, plain tile roof. Circular plan. Front recessed behind untrimmed timber supports to roof. Plain boarded doors to right and left, each under blank pointed heads. Two 9-pane windows, with shutters, to centre, each under similar blank pointed heads. Conical roof, roof dormers with casements with glazing bars, central, circular, stacks.

 

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WAYSIDE CROSS
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249393
WAYSIDE CROSS, SOUTHGATE
Grade: II
Cross. Probably C14. White limestone. Stepped and chamfered base, supporting shaft: lower portion 4-sided with trefoiled blank panels; upper portion tapering, eight-sided, with broach stops.

 

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BURNS FARM HORNSEA MUSEUM
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: BURNS FARM HORNSEA MUSEUM
List entry Number: 1263748
BURNS FARM, NEWBEGIN
HORNSEA MUSEUM, NEWBEGIN

House. Late C16 origins, largely rebuilt late C18. Orange brick on cobble foundations, colour washed to front, pan tiled roof. Central direct entry plan. Two storeys and attics, 2 bays. Balanced elevation. Central six- panel door flanked by tripartite sliding sashes. First floor: blank oculus over door flanked by 2 casements each to right and left bays. Dentilled brick eaves cornice, end stacks, raised gables. The interior, which now contains the collections of the North Holderness Museum of Village Life, retains several early features including a large inglenook fireplace, with elliptical chamfered head, to the kitchen.

RAILWAY STATION
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: RAILWAY STATION
List entry Number: 1249389
Railway station. 1864. By Rawlins Gould for the Hull and Hornsea Railway Company. Red brick with sandstone dressings, slate roof. Single storey, 15 bays 5:5:5, with lower 5-bay extension to left. Symmetrical elevation to main range. Centre 5 bays break forward to form a loggia. Chamfered plinth, rusticated quoins. Loggia has five round-headed arches with moulded bases and imposts and projecting key blocks, all with sandstone roundels to the spandrels. The centre opening is flanked by rusticated pilasters supporting a low pediment. Moulded cornice. Central double-leaf 6-panel door under fanlight with radial glazing in round-headed opening with projecting key block. All windows to right and left (now blocked) are rounded headed on sills with brackets in blank round-headed arches with moulded imposts, projecting keyblocks, and roundels to spandrels. Moulded. eaves cornice, end and axial stacks, hipped roofs. Wing to left is of similar character with central elliptical-headed opening (now blocked) flanked by two round-headed blank arches to right and left. Moulded eaves cornice, hipped roof.

 

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CROSS IN CHURCHYARD OF ST NICHOLAS
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: CROSS IN CHURCHYARD OF ST NICHOLAS
List entry Number: 1263786
Cross. Mediaeval, with C20 additions. White limestone. Triple-stepped plinth supporting base with corner chamfers and tapering cross-shaft with base moulding and broach-stops to chamfers. C20 cross finial.

THE NOOK
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: THE NOOK
List entry Number: 1249671
Location
THE NOOK, 52, SOUTHGATE
House, late C18 – early C19. Orange brick in Flemish bond, pantiled roof. 2 storeys, 2 bays. Door of 6 raised and fielded panels with fanlight with radial glazing under hoodmould to right: 16-pane sash with sill under wedge lintel to left. Similar 16-pane sashes to 1st floor. Raised coped gables, end stacks.

 

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YE OLD COTTAGE CAFE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: YE OLD COTTAGE CAFE
List entry Number: 1249388
House, C18. Single storey and attics, 2 cells. Brick, pebble dashed and colour washed, pantiled roof. End lobby plan. C20 door with glazing bars to right, two 12-pane unequal sashes to centre and left. End stacks, raised gables.

CORNER COTTAGE SUNSET COTTAGE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249639
One building. Before 1761. Cobbles with brick dressings, pantiled roof. Central direct entry plan with rear wing. Single storey and attics, 3 bays. Balanced elevation: central boarded door with sliding sash to left, C20 window with glazing bars to right. Roof dormers, sprocketed eaves, end and axial stacks, tumbled-in brick to raised gables. An earlier origin for this building is suggested by the existence of a single cruck blade in the north gable wall of Sunset Cottage.

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20, WESTGATE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: 20, WESTGATE
List entry Number: 1249735
House. Mid C18. Brick, rendered and colourwashed, pantiled roof. Central direct entry plan with continuous rear outshut. 1 storey and attics, 2 cells. Symmetrical elevation. Boarded door flanked by sliding sashes and gabled roof dormers with casements with glazing bars. End stacks, raised gables with rounded apices.

 

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32, WESTGATE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: 32, WESTGATE
List entry Number: 1263602
House. Early C18, with later parallel range to rear. Red brick, colourwashed to front, pantiled roof. 2 storeys, 3 bays, balanced elevation. 6-panel door under oblong fanlight with glazing bars in pilastered doorcase with bracketed cornice. C20 double sash to right of door: canted bays to right and left with 16-pane sashes and side windows with glazing bars. Louvred shutters to left bay. 1st floor: 16-pane sashes, with louvred shutters, throughout. Dentilled brick eaves cornice, end stacks, tumbled-in brick to raised gables of double-span roof.

 

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STABLE BLOCK TO THE WHITE HOUSE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1263750
Stable-block. C18. Red brick in irregular bond on cobble foundations, colourwashed; pantiled roof. 2 storey, 3 bays. Symmetrical elevation. Ground floor: C20 boarded door under segmental brick head flanked by window- openings with sills and segmental brick heads. First floor: similar, smaller, boarded door flanked by blocked openings identical to those below. Oculus to left gable. Stepped brick eaves cornice, tumbled-in brick to raised gables with brick kneelers.

 

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GROUP OF SEVEN RECUMBENT GRAVE MARKERS ABOUT 10 METRES WEST OF THE WHITE HOUSE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: GROUP OF SEVEN RECUMBENT GRAVE MARKERS ABOUT 10 METRES WEST OF THE WHITE HOUSE
List entry Number: 1249703
Group of grave markers. Late C17 – early C18. The graves are those of the Acklam family, who resided at the time in The White House (q.v.).

1. Here lyes Thomas and Annamaria Acklome his wife who both dy’d AD 1667 aged 72.

2. Here lyes Peter son of Thomas Acklome who dy’d AD 1690 aged 72 yrs.

3. Here lyes Thomas son of P Acklome who died AD 1699 aged 38.

4. Here lyes Annamaria Dter of P Acklome Jun who dyed AD 1700 aged 12.

5. Here lieth the remains of Peter son of Peter and Alice Acklome who died 29th July 1744 aged near 85.

6. C17, broken, illegible.

7. Broken, illegible

 

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THE WHITE HOUSE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: THE WHITE HOUSE
List entry Number: 1249390
House. c1674, extended C18; for the Acklam family. Brick and cobbles, rendered and colourwashed. 2 storeys with cellars and attics, originally 4 bays 2:1:1 with later extension to left. Central direct entry plan with original outshut for staircase to rear, later extended to right to form scullery. High chamfered plinth, cut down in places in late C19. 6-panel door with overlight under segmental head. Two 4-pane sashes to left, one to right. Cavetto-moulded first floor band. Three 4-pane sashes to first floor. Extension to left: ground floor has 4-pane sash to right, tripartite sliding sash with glazing bars to left. 1st floor: 4-pane sash to right. Rear elevation: 3-light wooden mullioned window with leaded panes, incorporating central roundels, to staircase wing. Stepped brick eaves cornice, roof dormer with sliding sash with glazing bars, end and axial stacks. Raised gables. Interior: this house possesses a number of original features including the following: ground floor, right room: overmantel with pilasters and cornice enclosing oil painting (on boards) of a naval battle. Round headed alcove to right. Ground floor, left room (probably former kitchen): flanking cupboards to fireplace. Closed string stair with bay leaf and riband frieze to string, newels with ball finials and turned pendants, and moulded handrail. The bottom newel is supported by a console bracket enriched with stylised bay leaves. First floor, right room: bolection-moulded fireplace and overmantel with pilasters and cornice enclosing a painting of Moses striking the rock. Left room: bolection- moulded fireplace and overmantel with pilasters, enriched with drops, and cornice, enclosing a painting of Noah and the Ark. The majority of doors in the house have bolection-moulded panels and are hung in eared architraves. Cupboard doors are also late C17/early C18 and retain their original hinges. There is a cellar beneath the stairwell and a pantry beneath the stair itself: the pantry door is three-panelled on iron hinges and is likely to represent the original pattern of the other doors of the house. The Acklams were a noted Quaker family and one of the first to be convinced in the East Riding. The grave-markers (q.v.) of several early members of the family survive in the garden to the rear.

 

East Field crop mark site centred 300m SSE of Northorpe, interpreted as a Neolithic henge later reused as a Bronze Age ringwork
This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
Name: East Field crop mark site centred 300m SSE of Northorpe, interpreted as a Neolithic henge later reused as a Bronze Age ringwork
List entry Number: 1423379
A complex crop mark site within an arable field, first identified in 2010. The focus of the scheduling is a clear circular feature that is interpreted as being a Neolithic henge. This is set within and respected by a field system, suggesting that the henge was reused in the late Bronze Age as a ringwork: a high status domestic enclosure, a site type also known as a Springfield style enclosure. The core of the surrounding field system is also included in the scheduling.

 

Moated site in Hall Garth Park
This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
Name: Moated site in Hall Garth Park
List entry Number: 1007845
The monument is the moated site at the western end of Hall Garth Park. It includes a sub-rectangular island enclosed by a dry moat and in part by an earthen bank. The moat is visible as an earthwork feature on the western, northern, and eastern sides; on the southern side it has been largely in-filled. The island measures 70m long, east-west, and 40m wide, north-south, overall. The visible arms of the moat are between 15m and 20m wide and up to 2m deep. The southern arm of the moat has been almost completely in-filled, with only a short section of the western end visible; the remainder of the arm will however survive as a buried feature. A gravel path has been laid along the bottom of the northern arm. The moat is crossed by two causeways; one at the north-east corner and the other across the eastern arm. Neither is thought to be an original crossing point. An earthen bank is visible immediately outside and adjacent to the moat’s northern arm, it is 5m wide and up to 1m high. A bank is also visible immediately within the eastern arm of the moat. It is 0.4m high and 3m wide. The moat was the site of the rectory of Hornsea’s parish church which, during the Middle Ages, was owned by the Abbey of Saint Mary in York. The church lies immediately to the south of the moated site. The house which stood on the island was sold during the reign of James I (1603-1625). This house had been demolished by 1787, by which time a new vicarage had been built to the south of the moated site. The site was incorporated into the town’s public park in the nineteenth century, and was later used as a feature in a golf course, one of the park’s facilities.

© Crown Copyright and database right 2018. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2018. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

 
Medieval settlement of Southorpe and field system, north east of Southorpe Farm
This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
Name: Medieval settlement of Southorpe and field system, north east of Southorpe Farm
List entry Number: 1003469
The monument includes the remains of a medieval settlement, known as Southorpe, and part of its associated field system, situated on gently rising ground on the south side of Hornsea Mere. The settlement is visible as a series of well defined earthworks, standing up to 1.5m high including hollow-ways running both east to west and north to south marking former lanes flanked by raised house platforms representing the sites of former buildings and small farmsteads, each with attached enclosures outlined by low banks. Around the occupation area there are the earthworks of part of the associated medieval field system surviving as ridge and furrow. Documentary sources indicate that the settlement, was in existence by 1086 and cottages were recorded here until the 17th century. However, by 1809 the settlement had become abandoned. Towards the centre of the monument there is a World War II pillbox. SOURCES PastScape Monument No:- 80651 (settlement), 913339 (pillbox) NMR:- TA14NE5 (settlement), TA14NE16 (pillbox) Humber SMR No:- 3549

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© Crown Copyright and database right 2018. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2018. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

 

 

Cobble Wall, Pump, and Pump Turn
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: Cobble Wall, Pump, and Pump Turn
List entry Number: 1418818
Location
7 Eastgate, Hornsea, East Riding of Yorkshire, HU18 1DN
Cobble boundary wall between 5 & 7 Eastgate, Hornsea

Late-C18/early-C19 cobble wall, associated with and possibly pre-dating the construction of Ivy Lodge (5 Eastgate), an early-C19 Regency style house. The wall delineated the north-eastern boundary to the garden of Ivy Lodge; it has been patched on a number of occasions and raised in height. A round-headed pedestrian gate (now demolished) allowed access to the stables and carriage house that were situated in the drive that ran along the eastern side of the wall. The stables were served by a hand pump and a stone horse trough situated against the wall. During the latter half of the C19, a section of walling was removed towards the southern end and re-built as a semi-circular walled recess, to allow for the installation of a donkey powered pump turn, which was used to raise water for a municipal fire engine. It is unknown when the pump went out of use. During the latter half of the C20, Ivy Lodge became a children’s home and the kitchen garden to the rear was sold and subsequently, a bungalow (7 Eastgate) was built on the parcel of land. The bungalow shared the drive and to improve vehicle access to the bungalow, the northern end of the wall was rebuilt with a splay to allow for the movement of vehicles. Early in 2014 the round arched doorway was demolished and a 4m wide opening was made in the wall to provide a vehicle gateway to the grounds of Ivy Lodge (5 Eastgate).

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3, EASTGATE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: 3, EASTGATE
List entry Number: 1263784
House. C18. Cobbles with some brick, pantiled roof. Central direct entry with outshut. Single storey and attics, 3 bays. Balanced elevation. C20 door to centre flanked by C20 window with glazing bars to left and two similar windows to right. Attic: 3 roof dormers with sliding sashes with glazing bars. End stacks, tumbled-in brick to raised gables.

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2, MARKET PLACE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: 2, MARKET PLACE
List entry Number: 1263785
House. Late C17 – early C18. Brick, colourwashed, with pantiled roof. Probably originally lobby-entry plan. Double-span roof. 2 storeys and attics, 4-window front. Ground floor: early C20 shopfronts, remodelled late C20. 1st floor: 16-pane sash to bay 1, 2-pane sash with sill to bay 2, blocked opening to bay 3, 12-pane sash to bay 4. Stepped brick eaves cornice, massive axial stack. Sash with sill and glazing bars under wedge lintel with projecting keyblock to right gable. Raised coped gables.

 

 

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VICARAGE AND WING WALLS
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: VICARAGE AND WING WALLS
List entry Number: 1249387
Vicarage. 1831. Brick, whitewashed, slate roofs. Central direct entry plan. Two storeys, three bays. Centre bay recessed. Ground floor: late C19 / early C20 porch flanked by sashes with glazing bars under slightly segmental gauged brick arches Sash to right has later side lights with glazing bars. First floor: casement with margin-pane glazing over door, flanked by 9-pane unequal sashes with glazing bars. Deep oversailing eaves on paired brackets, end stacks, hipped roof. Wing walls: left has round- headed opening under ramped coping, right has C20 double-leaf doors and similar ramped coping.

 

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CHURCH OF SAINT NICHOLAS
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
Name: CHURCH OF SAINT NICHOLAS
List entry Number: 1249386
Church. C13 nave and aisles, late C13 tower, altered and enlarged late C14 and C15, restored by Scott 1865-7. Cobbles with freestone dressings. West tower, 4-bay aisled nave with south porch (formerly with south chapel), 4- bay chancel with north and south aisled chapels and eastern crypt. West tower: 3 stages, embraced by westward extension of nave aisles. Chamfered plinth, angle buttresses with offsets, chamfered strings. Pointed openings with Y-tracery under hoodmoulds to 2nd and 3rd stages. Crenellated parapet with eight crocketed pinnacles. Pointed double-chamfered west door under stopped hoodmould. Four-light west window with Perpendicular tracery under 4-centred arch. Nave: 3 buttresses with offsets to westward extension of aisles. 2 grouped lancets to west; similar window to east in blocked pointed chamfered opening to former south chapel. Clerestory: 3-light pointed windows with Perpendicular tracery. Low parapet with moulded coping. Pointed south door under oblong hoodmould with blank trefoils and mouchettes to spandrels. Chancel: moulded plinth, corner buttresses, 3 grouped lancets to south aisle. East bay (added 1430) has five-light pointed windows with Perpendicular tracery to north and south walls. Clerestory: three 3-light pointed window with Perpendicular tracery. Seven- light pointed east window with Perpendicular tracery. Low parapet with crocketed pinnacles and cross finial to coped gable. Interior: triple- chamfered tower arches to north and south. North and south nave arcades of pointed arches with continuous double chamfers: the north on high bases, the south on similar, lower, bases. Pointed chancel arch with continuous fluted mouldings dying into plain bases. Chancel: pointed arches to north and south arcades with continuous chamfer and scrolled hoodmould on high moulded base. Giant blank pointed arches with continuous chamfer enclosing clerestory windows. Crypt, of unknown date, below east bay reached by spiral stair from north choir aisle and small door with shouldered arch (perhaps a former window) beneath east window of chancel. Fireplace with rebated opening under segmental arch to north wall; inserted early C19 double brick vault. Early C13 octagonal font, each face with blank paired lancets in low relief, to nave west end. Memorials: north nave aisle, east end: C13 recumbent effigy in secular clothing. From the church of Saint Giles, Goxhill. Recumbent effigies of a knight and lady from the church of Saint Helena and Saint Mary Magdalene, Nunkeeling; late C13. Chancel south aisle, east end: alabaster tomb chest to Revd. Anthony St. Quintin, died 1430. Sides with blank shields in quatrefoils, remains of inscription to edge of covering slab. This is covered in early graffiti, including large numbers of ‘footprints’.

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UNITED REFORMED CHURCH
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249383
Church. Built 1868 as a Congregational Church. Light brown with red brick dressings, slate roof. Gothic Revival style 3-stage south-west tower with baoach spire, continuous 3-bay nave and 2-bay chancel, west porch. Tower: south door under shouldered lintel in pointed opening with blank sexfoil and two roundels to tympanum. Paired lancets with detached central colonette under octofoil window in pointed opening to 2nd stage; paired lancets with paired central colonnettes with annuli and carved capitals to belfry. Central clock under gablet. Broach spire with moulded band and foliated finial. West porch: double-chamfered plinth, buttresses with offsets, pointed opening. Double boarded west doors in pointed opening under five-light pointed window with Geometrical plate tracery. 3 stepped lancets with louvres to belfry. Nave: chamfered plinth, buttresses with offsets. Centre bay has 3-light pointed window with Geometrical plate tracery, under gable, flanked by paired trefoil-headed lancets with oculi above in pointed openings. Dentilled brick eaves cornice, ridge cresting. Transepts: 2- light pointed windows to east and west with Geometrical tracery: large octofoil window to gable. Interior: west gallery, now blocked, round piers with decorated capitals to transepts.

 

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Bettisons Folly
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249626
Folly. Mid C19. Built entirely of rusticated overfired brick wasters. Circular tower of five stages separated by projecting brick string-courses. Ground floor has pointed door outlined in projecting brick and similar pointed window, now blocked. Lancets to first and second floor, larger pointed window and oculus to third floor, all with projecting brick surrounds. Stepped brick cornice to crenellated parapet. In addition to the windows there are at second and third floor levels various diamond- shaped blank openings into which bottle-bases have been inserted to form a pattern. Said to have been built by a Hornsea man, in business in Hull, in order to allow his family to view his impatiently-awaited return

 

3, SOUTHGATE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249392
House. Late C18. Brown brick in Flemish bond, cast Roman tile roof. 2 storeys, 4 bays 1:1:2. Door of 6 beaded panels with fanlight in panelled soffit and reveals. Doric doorcase with fluted pilasters and dosserets supporting open pediment with mutules. Early C20 shop-front to right, 16- pane sashes elsewhere, all with sills and cambered channelled wedge lintels with projecting keyblocks. First floor: similar 16-pane sashes throughout. C20 roof dormer. End and axial stacks. Raised coped gable to left, hipped roof to right.

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65 AND 66, SOUTHGATE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1263749
House, now 2 dwellings, late C17 – early C18, remodelled in mid C19 and late C20. Cobble with some brick, rendered and colourwashed to front and end elevations. Pantiled roof. Lobby entry plan. 2 storeys, 3 bays. Originally balanced elevation. 6-panel door under oblong fanlight with glazing bars in pilastered doorcase with ellipses to dosserets, under projecting cornice, to centre (No 65); 4-panel door in plainer pilastered doorcase to right (No 66). 16-pane early C19 bow window to right; C20 bow windows with glazing bars elsewhere. 1st floor: tripartite sliding sashes with glazing bars and sills. Raised coped gables, rebuilt axial stack. Rear elevation 1st floor has sliding sash with glazing bars to left, round-headed window with glazing bars and radial glazing to right.

 

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PIKE AND HERON PUBLIC HOUSE
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249384
Public House. c1830. Brick, rendered and stuccoed, slate roof. Lobby entry plan. 3 storeys, 3 bays. Ground floor: rusticated stucco finish. C20 sliding door in Doric pilastered doorcase. Tripartite sash with sill and glazing bars to left, two 16-pane sashes with sills to right, all under wedge lintels with projecting vermiculated keyblocks. First floor band, rusticated rock-faced quoins to upper storeys. First floor: three 16-pane sashes all under wedge lintels with projecting vermiculated keyblocks. 2nd floor: small 4-pane sash to left, and three 8-pane sashes, all with sills and under wedge lintels with projecting rock-faced keyblocks. End and axial stacks, plain close verges to gables on kneelers.

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THE OLD HALL
This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.
List entry Number: 1249385
House. Early C17. Red brick on cobble footings, plain tile roof. Central direct entry to hall range with projecting cross wings; lower wing to left, late C19 glasshouse to right. Main range of two storeys and attics, 3 bays; lower wing to left of 2 storeys, 2 bays. Stepped brick plinth: quarter- round moulded plinth to side wall of right cross-wing. Hall range has central 4-panel door under elliptical head, with canopy on scrolled brackets with heart motif, flanked by cross-mullion windows with leaded lights and sills under segmental gauged brick heads. Cross-wings have early C20 square bays each with two cross-mullion windows with leaded lights, sills, and segmental gauged brick heads, and low ramped coped parapet. First floor: elliptical-headed niche with imposts, projecting keyblock, and apron, containing statue of an Amazon, over door, flanked by cross-mullion windows with leaded lights, sills, and segmental gauged brick arches. Band to right cross-wing. Two similar windows, and one casement to the attic storey, to each cross-wing. Dentilled brick eaves cornice to hall range; shaped gables with iron ties to cross-wings. Axial stacks. Lower wing to right has casements with leaded lights throughout, all with sills under segmental gauged brick heads. First floor band, dentilled brick eaves cornice. End stack, shaped gable. Interior: several original features survive including the hall fireplace which has a rubbed brick elliptical arch, decorated with a wave-moulded chamfer; the room to the right cross-wing ground floor which is filled with bolection-moulded panelling and has a fireplace with a pilastered overmantel, and a large number of C17 and C18 doors. A cupboard in the hall has a 3-panel bolection moulded door on its original hinges which is very similar to that surviving as the pantry door to the White House, Southgate, in the same parish. (q.v.)